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Publication times and validity

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Winter

In winter, the avalanche bulletin is published twice a day. It consists of two parts:

Avalanche danger (hazard map, including danger description)

  • 5 pm edition: forecast of the avalanche danger until 5 pm the next day (in four languages)
  • 8 am edition: forecast of the avalanche danger until 5 pm the same day (in four languages)
  • In principle, an assessment of the avalanche danger at other times is also possible, but only very occasional use is made of this possibility.

Snowpack and weather

  • 5 pm edition in German, applying until 5 pm the next day
  • The translations (into French, Italian and English) will be available by 6 pm at the latest.
 

Early and late winter season

In early winter (typically from November to early December) and late spring (typically from late April to May) the avalanche bulletin is only published in the evening. The format and content are the same as in winter. The bulletin may cover a period of several days, running until 5 pm on the final day.

 

Summer and autumn

From early summer until autumn, avalanche bulletins are published in case of heavy snowfall, and in late autumn at other times as well if the snow cover warrants it. As in this period the volume of on-site data available is less than in mid-winter, these are plain-text bulletins with no hazard maps and also generally no danger levels. They may cover a period of several days, running until 5 pm on the final day.

  • Edition in German published at 5 pm
  • The translations (into French, Italian and English) will be available by 6.30 pm at the latest.

The criteria for the publication of a summer avalanche bulletin are met if the forecast depth of fresh-fallen snow per precipitation event (normally 1 – 3 days) reaches one of the following values:

  • 20 cm at 2000 m
  • 40 cm at 2500 m
  • 60 cm at 3000 m
  • 80 cm at 3500 m

These values are only intended as a guide. Whether a bulletin is actually published also depends on the wind, the temperature and the extent and properties of the existing snowpack. Furthermore, the snowfall event must affect at least one whole massif; local snow flurries caused for example by individual thunderstorm cells do not count towards this.